Helen Argers Novelist, Humorist, Poet!

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    REVIEWS OF REST OF HELEN ARGERS'  NOVELS

"A Lady of Independence" was published by DOUBLEDAY -- received a rare 5 star from R. Times and Raves from Booklist and all others.

Kirkus Reviews:"A surprisingly freewheeling regency "  It was also saluted for its "much verbal sparring" . . . very funny moments . . . unusual variety in backgrounds."  It concluded:  "a. . . divertingly offbeat, fairly 'blue' change from the regency routine."

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THREE BERKLEY PAPERBACKS GOT RAVE REVIEWS AND WERE HIGH STARRED. All written under Helen Argers' name.         

    1.  "A SCANDALOUS LADY"

                      A mother and her two daughters discover their father was a lord and so his estate was left to a stranger -- leaving them penniless but  not without resolution to get back their name, property and even reputation by taking on the wealthy lord who had taken all from them.    4 STAR REVIEW

   

     

 

 

 

 

                  2.  A  CAPTAIN'S LADY" 

              A no-holds-barred seafaring tale of a society succumbing to a captain and a lady who captained her own ship and future.   "Stunning scenes of the Isle of Wight and a clipper ship race to the finish."

    

  3.                                           

 

 "An Unlikely Lady" 

       A Pygmalion story of a young girl from the lowest position, rising to the highest  and shocking all by controlling society.        

               

 

 

 

 

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  THREE HARPERCOLLINS PAPERBACKS PUBLISHED  UNDER THE PSEUDONYM --   HELEN  ARCHERY

 

     1.   "THE SEASON OF LOVING"

 

   --  A Christmas story -- featuring the Twelve Days of Christmas  celebrated  authentically and a young woman, named Merrie, who was and ever will be the spirit of Christmas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    2.  "LADY ADVENTURESS" 

 

 

 

 

 

 --a daring woman who poses as a highwayman to meet the debts owed by her family and is determined to outwit society to steal the biggest matrimonial catch from the most elegant titled ladies.  Signaled out by R. Times as the most captivating Hero and love story.

 

 

Example of  International reading of Helen's novels.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  "Lady Adventuress" was reprinted in

Chinese and read in all those countries.

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

  

 3.  "DUEL OF HEARTS" 

 

--a flawless blending of history's most

 shocking trial of King George's attempt to impeach his Queen and the duels between those for the King and those for the Queen that destroyed a couple on opposite sides.  Each sought to prove the right of their stand, risking the end of their joining, although they had conquered a mountain to be together

 

 

 

 

 

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   ANOTHER NOVEL BY HELEN --AKA--ARCHERY

        PUBLISHED BY RANDOM HOUSE'S 

             BALLANTINE-FAWCETT.

             "THE AGE OF ELEGANCE"

     

 A novel noted for its epigrammatic dialogue and quips and saluted for capturing the verbal sparring of the regency ladies and gentlemen.  It is the story of a young daughter of a famous socialite mother who is ashamed that her daughter has none of her charm and wit.  Yet when forced to find her a husband, she chooses one she would prefer--another charming wit and rake and  is shocked, shocked when her daughter refuses his offer.  Yet it is this young lady, Miss Emmalie Marlowe, who turns her mother's world upside down.  

 

              Here is a sample of her mother's reaction when Emmalie says, "Nothing shall induce me to agree to that connection." 

              "Enough!  Can your mental facilities be so limited and your filial devotion so skimpy that you cannot offer me more than that response?  No, preamble of, 'Much as I am obliged to you, Mother, for the extraordinary efforts on the part of my unworthy self. . . '  No, not even that courtesy. . . You are trying my paitience too far.  What a waste of inheritance. Even your father, though given to fits of deplorable cockle-brained humors and notions, was generally a man of some sense -- as evidenced by his seeking out my hand. But you, you have never given me an instance of the slightest sign of intelligence.   If I did not have the greatest confidence in Nurse Mary, I should seriously suspect that you were switched in your cradle and are the daughter of a country bumpkin.  I must repair to my apartments to recover from this your latest, but certainly your most wounding . . . disappointment."